Venice, Italy + your travel tips

Our last stop in Italy (after Rome and Florence) was Venice. We just had a day and half there, but it ended up being a perfect amount of time to see the highlights. First stop, lunch and a beer!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Venice is an interesting town. As you probably know, it’s entirely made up of islands. There are no cars in historic Venice, only boats on the canals.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In our day and a half, we rode the vapparetto (water taxi) from one end of the grand canal to the other several times, and we spent an inordinate amount of time wandering around on foot, looking at buildings, shops, and homes.

???????????????????????????????

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

How cool is that farmer’s market? It’s a boat!

Bob was pretty psyched to find Campo de San Barnaba, which is where the beginning of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was filmed.  The inside doesn’t actually look like the library from the movie, unfortunately.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MM14150

We capped off our time in Venice with a gondola ride, one last gelato, and a fancy dinner. It was a beautiful evening, and the perfect way to end a great trip.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Venice tips!

  • Lodging: we stayed in Mestre, where it was much more affordable. There are plenty of buses that run to and from historic Venice on a regular basis–just ask at your hotel, and they will direct you to the closest stop.
  • Transportation: if you’re under 30 years old, buy a Rolling Venice card for 4 euro, and you will get 3 days of unlimited boat and bus rides for only 20 euro. If you’re over 30, there are still transit passes available. They’re a bit more expensive, but still very worth it. You can ride unlimited amounts of Venice transit boats or buses for however many days you purchase (1, 2, or 3). The advantages:
    1. You don’t have to constantly be refilling cards and monitoring your balance.
    2. If you swipe into the wrong stop, no worries! Just leave and find the right one. Without an unlimited transit card, a mistake like that would cost you 7 euro per person–because you already swiped it for one ride.

I wanna hear from YOU. Based on your trips, travels, and vacations, what do you recommend? Where do you like to stay? How do you get around? Any must have shoes or clothes or luggage? Can’t live without beauty products? Favorite way to sleuth out the best restaurant in town? Share in the comments below, and I’ll link to you in my post next week Thursday.

5 thoughts on “Venice, Italy + your travel tips

  1. Venice is one of those cities that really suffer from the masses of tourists that come in there, ironically enough. Therefore there are some ethical factors that should be considered whenever you wish to travel there.
    For one, you should not arrive with a cruise ship. The ships are literally destroying the city and each time one arrives the harbour next to Piazza di San Marco the place is so crowded someone claustrophobic would definitely have an attack.
    The other thing the cruise ships do is as they bring people to explore in Venice for a couple of hours, the city itself gains little compensation considering how much money is pumped into the product we know as Venice. Therefore it would be best if the trip lasted at least a couple of days and at least some money was spent in local products and services.

    • Wow! I rarely consider the ethical ramifications of travel. Thanks for bringing this up. I’m glad to say we arrived by train, took public transit, and spent plenty of money in local food, products, and services 🙂

  2. Pingback: How to Have an Awesome Vacation | Balance and Blueberries

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s